pious
I have a lot to say, you just have to ask the right questions.
-Unknown   (via fawuhn)

North Korea has always served as a “devil function,” an enormously useful enemy for the United States.

The Korean War, coming as it did on the heels of World War II, sparked an economic boom domestically and legitimated the unprecedented worldwide garrisoning of large numbers of American troops in a network of bases around the world. In essence, it furnished the occasion for a remilitarized remapping of the globe that in turn enabled the reconstruction of the world market under American auspices.

It began in 1945 when the occupation line was drawn at the 38th parallel. Two junior US Army officers, Charles Bonasteel and Dean Rusk, armed with nothing more than a National Geographic map, split Korea in two within half an hour. This separated one in three families and prompted a war of national reunification.

During a three-year window, 3.5 million North Koreans, the majority of them civilians, were killed. At the hands of the United States, North Koreans suffered one of the most appalling, unrestrained bombing campaigns in our genocidal 20th century, and ever since they have been shouting themselves hoarse at a nation of amnesiacs [the United States] who aren’t listening.

For Americans, the Korean War may have slipped into the ash heap of history and is, at best, a vague footnote. For the North Koreans, the so-called “Forgotten War” has had indelible consequences.

Never in the mainstream US media do you hear that North Korea has asked the United States for a peace treaty more than 100 times. The image of North Korea as a country that actively seeks peace is not consonant with the jingoistic caricature that we’re typically confronted with in mainstream media policy discourse.


-Christine Hong, U.S. vs North Korea: The Hunger Games (via koreaunderground)
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In my dial-up youth I was determined to be as dreamy and wide-eyed about the natural world as the fictional character Anne Shirley, so I recited “The Lady of Shalott” on a bed of clovers in my yard as a sort of chant that would comfort the trees and sidewalk—things I turned into living, feeling beings. Then, in the saturnine days of middle school, I found comfort in the fantasia of Plath and Sexton. I remember writing wry little stanzas that I felt proud to see in an edition of Hands on Stanzas and presenting the poem about molasses and fat mothers to my father. As I grew to understand my mother more, I became more convinced by the lyrical beauty and ethical depth of poetry. Words impress themselves behind my eyes. 

afangirltumbles:

sesamestreet:

We’re still trying to make “fetch” happen.

True story: when I was in college I had a bright orange polo & would only wear it with pigtails. I figured the first person who realized it was a Barkley tribute would be worth my friendship.
Reader, I married him.

afangirltumbles:

sesamestreet:

We’re still trying to make “fetch” happen.

True story: when I was in college I had a bright orange polo & would only wear it with pigtails. I figured the first person who realized it was a Barkley tribute would be worth my friendship.

Reader, I married him.
1650
theparisreview:

“Will these characters be okay? Not necessarily. Eloise, however, might have some good times with a few of her husbands.“
Sadie Stein on the golden age of the Urban Child in children’s literature.

theparisreview:

“Will these characters be okay? Not necessarily. Eloise, however, might have some good times with a few of her husbands.“

Sadie Stein on the golden age of the Urban Child in children’s literature.

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Nobody tells this to people who are beginners. I wish someone had told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase; they quit. Most people I know who do interest, creative, work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know that it’s normal and the important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you finish one piece. It’s only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take a while. It’s normal to take awhile. You just gotta fight your way through.
-Ira Glass (x)
fakak:

hisashi eguchi

fakak:

hisashi eguchi

6063
Anonymous asked Do you know of any diverse books featuring Asian (as in Chinese) people which are NOT about their race or the like? I love reading about characters like Frank Zhang from the Heroes of Olympus series!

cielrouge:

weneeddiversebooks:

I love books like that too! Which is why I loved Mike Jung’s Geeks, Girls and Secret Identities, bc the MC is a Korean American boy but the story is not about his identity at all - but that of the superhero! And Malinda Lo’s Adaptation which is a suspenseful sci fi thriller, has one of the romantic leads, David, who is Chinese American. There’s also Cassandra Clare’s Mortal Instruments (Magnus) and Infernal Devices (Jem) series with Asian characters who’s race has nothing to do with the storyline. But it’s late now and my brain is starting to shut down. I keep coming up with books where the race is definitely a part of the story and having to cross them off. Hopefully, the tumblr community can come up with some more recs to help us out here!

Off the top of my head, I know of Kimberly Pauley’s “Cat Girl Day’s Off,” Lisa Yee’s “Stanford Wong Flunks Big Time,” and Justina Chen’s “Girl Overboard?” You might want to check out Laurence Yep’s (Chinese-American) and David Yoo’s (he’s Korean-American) books as well. And not about Chinese people per se, but Tahereh Mafi’s “Shatter Me” series features a Japanese MC, Kenji Kishimoto, and from what I recall, Myra McEntire’s “Hourglass” series features a Samoan MC, Dune Ta’ala, who is one of the main characters in the last book in the series, “Infinityglass.” Likewise, Ellen Oh’s “Prophecy” series and Linda Sue Park’s “Archer’s Quest” (both historical fantasy reads) might interest you as well. Hope that helps! I did create this YA & MG Speculative Fiction List and a separate Sino and Sino-Americans List too…

For reference. 

Where is the line between fiction and history for a people whose histories have been blown off the face of the earth by slavery, by genocide, by colonialism, by the horror regimes and the endless erasures and calumnies of modernity? What is history to those who live in the amnesiatic heart of that great trauma we now euphemistically call the New World?
-Junot Diaz [x] (via mujeristaxicana)